How long does it take pressure treated wood to dry after rain?

Is it OK to leave pressure treated wood in the rain?

While the chemicals in pressure treated lumber prevent rot and ward off insects, they don’t prevent moisture from seeping into the wood. On a deck that’s going to be directly exposed to rain, water can seep into the boards and cause them to swell. As they dry in the sun, they’ll shrink.

How long does it take a deck to dry after rain?

As a general rule, 48 hours is sufficient drying time for a newly washed deck.

Will pressure treated wood dry outside?

Stack wet lumber on a flat surface such as a driveway or patio, use spacers between boards to let air circulate and check the wood for weight and by touch for moisture. We have let pressure-treated lumber sit for four or more weeks in 90-degree weather until it was dry enough to use without shrinking.

How long can pressure treated wood sit outside?

It depends on the climate, the type of wood, its uses, and how well it’s maintained. While pressure treated poles can stay up to 40 years without any signs of rot or decay, decks and flooring might only last around 10 years.

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What happens if it rains right after I stain my deck?

If it rains within 48 hours after you apply the stain, the water will soak into the wood pores and try to displace the stain. This will result in a splotchy surface rather than an even tone. If it rains right after you apply the stain, the stain will peel and flake off.

How long should I let my deck dry before staining?

In perfect drying conditions, 48 hours is enough for the wood to get to where it needs to be before staining. Decks that don’t get much sun should be given an extra day to dry out. If after a day or two the wood still looks wet or there are soft spots, give it more time to dry out.

What happens if you don’t dry wood?

If a product is made before the shrinkage takes place damage to joints can occur and the product will fail. If the shrinkage is not excessive, the wood may warp even though the joints may not break.