What is the wind speed of a category 1 tornado?

What is a Category 1 tornado?

F1 Category Tornado

Moderate Tornado. Moderate damage: Peels surfaces off roofs; mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned; outbuildings demolished; moving autos pushed off the roads; trees snapped or broken.

What is a Level 3 tornado?

EF1 (T2–T3) damage has caused significantly more fatalities than those caused by EF0 tornadoes. At this level, damage to mobile homes and other temporary structures becomes significant, and cars and other vehicles can be pushed off the road or flipped. Permanent structures can suffer major damage to their roofs.

Is there a category 0 tornado?

Theodore Fujita developed a method for categorizing tornadoes by looking at how much damage they cause and using this to estimate the wind speed. … Tornadoes are classified into five categories, F-0 through F-5.

What is Category 2 tornado?

The Fujita Scale

F Scale Character Estimated winds
Zero (F0) Weak 40-72 mph
One (F1) Weak 73-112 mph
Two (F2) Strong 113-157 mph
Three (F3) Strong 158-206 mph

How fast is a F6 tornado?

The Fujita Scale

F-Scale Number Intensity Phrase Wind Speed
F0 Gale tornado 40-72 mph
F4 Devastating tornado 207-260 mph
F5 Incredible tornado 261-318 mph
F6 Inconceivable tornado 319-379 mph

What is a F1 F2 f3 and F5 tornado?

F1 – F1 tornadoes are moderate. The wind speeds are between 73 mph and 112 mph. They can overturn mobile homes and push cars off the road. F2 – F2 tornadoes are significant with wind speeds between 113 mph and 157 mph. … F5 – F5 tornadoes are incredibly strong with wind speeds between 261 mph and 318 mph.

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Has there ever been an F6 tornado?

There is no such thing as an F6 tornado, even though Ted Fujita plotted out F6-level winds. The Fujita scale, as used for rating tornados, only goes up to F5. Even if a tornado had F6-level winds, near ground level, which is *very* unlikely, if not impossible, it would only be rated F5.

What was the strongest tornado?

Officially, the widest tornado on record is the El Reno, Oklahoma tornado of May 31, 2013 with a width of 2.6 miles (4.2 km) at its peak.