Frequent question: Does cold weather affect joint pain?

Why do my joints hurt when it’s cold?

Atmospheric pressure acting on the joints decreases in wintertime allowing the joints to expand a little bit resulting in stretching of tissues around the joint. This irritates nerve endings which causes pain.

Does joint pain get worse in cold weather?

There is no one explanation for why dropping temperatures affect your joints. One theory relates to drops in barometric pressure, which cause tendons, muscles and the surrounding tissues to expand. Because of the confined space within the body, this can cause pain, especially in joints affected by arthritis.

What is better for aching joints heat or cold?

Heat increases blood flow to an affected area, which promotes healing and relaxes muscle spasms. Cold restricts blood flow, reducing swelling and inflammation. It also numbs pain around the affected area. Generally speaking, ice is better for inflammatory pain.

What is the best weather for arthritis?

For most arthritis sufferers, the best places to live with arthritis have climates that are warm and dry. While it may sound like an old wives’ tale that a person can predict the rain with an ache in their knee, it could actually be accurate.

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Can the weather affect your joints?

Another idea: Changes in barometric pressure may make your tendons, muscles, and any scar tissue expand and contract, and that can create pain in joints affected by arthritis. Low temperatures can also make the fluid inside joints thicker, so they feel stiffer.

When does arthritis hurt the most?

Pain in one or more of your joints is the classic symptom of this condition. Usually it starts to hurt when you use the joint or right after you wake up. The pain also often gets worse at the end of the day.

Is arthritis worse in summer or winter?

People with arthritis often say that they can predict the weather based on how their joints feel. Some notice their pain and stiffness flares up in the cold and wet winter months, while others find hot and humid summer weather can make symptoms worse.

Does arthritis flare up go away?

In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a flare can be related to natural variations in the processes that cause inflammation. This means flares can vary in intensity, duration and frequency, but they’re usually reversible – if treated promptly.